Food the fuel of life

The Maggie Bear Foundation established in 2014 aims to improve the food experiences for older Australians. Working in fellowship with her board of industry leaders, professors and health advisors, Maggie is focused on how the food that we eat impact upon brain health and general wellbeing. One suggested initiative is the creation of kitchen-gardens which aged care residents can assist to maintain, or a smaller projects like easily grown kitchen herbs, salad greens and/or spinach in pots.

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More than an apple a day, to keep illness at bay

The World Health Organisation has identified that older people should not be exposed to temperatures lower than 20 degrees and around 24°C is a comfortable temperature during winter months. The rising costs of electricity is a major concern for all, however spare a thought for our elderly who are attempting to keep warm on reduced incomes, often in larger family homes. 

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Dental health and dementia

Dental health is essential, though many of us actively avoid the dentist. However maintaining dental health as we age is of vital importance. It is expected that by 2015, 900,000 Australians will be living with dementia. It is likely that as dementia advances that a person living with it may lose the ability to brush their own teeth.

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Mental health throughout the life span

Maintaining positive psychological and emotional well-being throughout our lifespan is a challenge for all of us. Surprisingly, the highest rate of suicide in Australia is for men over 85 years of age. In recognition of the increased need for mental health services for the aged, Australian Government Minister for Health, the Hon. Greg Hunt has committed a further five million dollars for seven research projects. These projects are focused on practical approaches to suicide prevention among older Australians.

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What to do about Fido?

Humanity has had an interwoven relationship with animals throughout civilisation, particularly with the domesticated canine. Two-thirds of Australian households, consider their furry companions as family members, so what happens to the pets of elderly people when they transition into residential care? This is of great concern to the Animal Welfare League of Australia (AWLA) who are engaged in a project, Positive Ageing in the Company of Animals.

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New training package provides perspective on dementia

A new free experiential training package developed by Dementia Australia and funded by the Department of Social Services Aged Care Services Improvement and Health Ageing Grants Program was released today. It aims to assist practitioners to adopt a more sensitive, informed and considered practice, leading to a better experience for all involved.

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Ask us how to save a life

Learning how to save a life is simple. At CFAA we deliver training that is meaningful, relevant and that can make all the difference.  Just ask us how we customise our training delivery to meet your specific industry needs. Ring 1300 177 337 for award-winning delivery that is a whole lot of fun.

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Shout out for flexible housing options for seniors

Building agility into house design which supports all stages of a family life has become essential, as families look for ways to retain investment in larger parental homes and seniors look for alternatives to remain living independently. Design considerations that promote fiscal maximisation, support people as they transition from empty-nesters to retirees, make downsizing more attractive and affordable to an increasingly connected and environmentally aware ageing population.

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Flexible models of care in focus

Aged care and how it is delivered occupies the focus of many individuals, including peak bodies, commercial and not-for-profit residential aged care providers and community services agencies, health practitioners, care workers, politicians, architects, researchers and academics, to name but a few. The challenge is to build modern architecturally smart, flexible communities that incorporate the needs of the healthy and those with multiple complex health conditions and which promote living a meaningful connected life with family, friends and the community that matters to each individual. No doubt such clever social innovation will come at a cost, which unfortunately may be far too high for the majority of Australians.

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Virtually present for aged care applications

Virtual reality or VR has entered our language and it seems may also enter in many facets of our lives, now and in the future. Will it ever replace the power of human contact? Perhaps not, however it may enable your loved one in another country, to share experiences with their grandchildren which enables to keep the thread of connection alive and in turn assists the older person to maintain greater cognitive function.

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